Tag Archives: sustainability

The American Thinker also says local government is being replaced with Regional Governance!

As often as groups will have me I have shared a presentation about how local government in NC is slowly being replaced by “regional governance”. Even Pat McCrory, the Republican candidate for Governor, has consistently fought for regional planning that crosses traditional political boundaries. I have NEVER seen anyone in the media nail the truth as well as Howard Houchen has in the article linked below entitled An American Politburo. Thanks to Cheryl Pass from GTP for passing along.

You can also see the link after it to see proof of it in NC.

An American Politburo.

http://www.onencnaturally.org/pages/SC_NC_Regional_Planning_Groups.html

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Govern Edmond Locally (GEL) is a shining example of what can be done!

So how have we gone from Republican Party officials feigning ignorance about Agenda 21 to a unanimous resolution condemning it… because one liberty group would not rest until they did. I believe Govern Edmond Locally, or GEL for short, can be a shining example of what liberty groups everywhere can do if they will stick together, and take action.

A very active member of GEL, and author, Vehoae sent me this in an email:  

In November 2011, Robert Semands  spoke before the Woodward County [Oklahoma] Republican Women organization, of which Carolyn McLarty is a member.  Carolyn McLarty is also a National Republican Party Committeewoman from Woodward County (in northwest Oklahoma, near the panhandle).  Robert had been asked to adress the subject of Agenda-21/Sustainable development during the November 2011 meeting.  Afterward, McLarty assembled many Republican Committeepersons from other states to co-sponsor the resolution, which eventually passed at the Winter meeting of the Republican National Committee.”

Maybe it is just me…but it would appear not all state level GOP committee’s are as “closed and partisan” as what I have experienced in Cleveland county, and North Carolina.

Thank you Robert, Vehoae, GEL, and all of the RNC members who sponsored, co-sponsored, and passed this resolution!

http://www.gop.com/Images/CommsLogo/2012_wintermeeting_resolutions.pdf

 

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This is where NC is headed: where we live in a world where we have to sue to install wastewater plants!

“Delawares’ Natural Resources and Environmental Control Secretary Collin P. O’Mara said in his opinion that a proposed 39,600 gallon-per-day wastewater plant for The Landings was “contrary to sound environmental policies” and “will enable intensive development to occur in an environmentally sensitive area” outside Delaware’s targeted growth zones.” Click here to read article.

This is the exact type of policies the Sustainable Communities Task Force will attempt to implement in your town.

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theblaze: UN Sec Gen Calls for ‘Revolution’

World Economic System Is ‘Global Suicide Pact’ http://t.co/5e5LkKg

Posted with WordPress for BlackBerry.

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“Sustainable Development” is old news for leaders of Cleveland County, but did YOU know about it?

 

EPA funded- Sustainable Environment for Quality of Life

EPA/SEQL Funded Centralina Council of Governments

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I’m sure at this point most of us have heard the often quoted phrase, “10% unemployment is the new normal“. I was not able to find anyone who actually said those exact words, however I did find one statement in my view that is close enough.

In October of 2010 Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz, speaking at the 7th World Business Forum, stated “Even if  the U.S. economy manages to grow, it will be too slow to provide enough jobs needed and a high unemployment rate will be a new normal for Americans”.  (Click here to read source)

In a previous post (click here to read) detailing how the LeGrand Conference Center, and the new Shelby Middle School are being constructed using Federal Stimulus money, Gaspee quoted County Manager David Dear:   

“The county unemployment rate is currently 14.3%. Retail sales have continued to decline and local housing starts are currently very depressed. Despite declining revenues, this budget focuses on maintaining overall public expenditures at current levels.”  (Click here to read)

Cleveland County’s unemployment is 14%… the new normal is “High” unemployment for Americans…really? I’m NOT ok with that.

Gaspee interviewed Jason Falls, newly elected Cleveland County Commissioner, and Commissioner Falls made no bones about the need he sees for economic and job growth in Cleveland County. So what’s holding our county back? Why aren’t we growing?

At 14% unemployment, is ANY idea off the table?

The answer is yes. Cleveland County leadership, at least since 2005, is only interested in “sustainable growth.”

In 2005 42 of Cleveland County’s community leaders, including business and government, signed on to the UN’s agenda of “Sustainable Development“. I know that sounds wildly unbelievable, but I implore the reader to continue before you dismiss me out of hand.

According to the Cleveland County Land Use Plan of 2005 Cleveland County became a member of an EPA funded program called Sustainable Environment for Quality of Life or SEQL.  This is from the About Section of SEQL’s website (click here to read)

“SEQL is an integrated environmental initiative for the 15-county metropolitan Charlotte region in North and South Carolina.

SEQL involves elected officials, local government staffs, business and industry groups, economic development groups and environmental stakeholder groups working together toward viable solutions to regional growth.

SEQL is regional in its vision and influence, but local in application.

SEQL promotes implementation of specific Action Items on Air Quality, Sustainable Growth and Water Resources and consideration of environmental impacts in decision-making at local and regional levels.

SEQL is funded by a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to Centralina Council of Governments in cooperation with Catawba Regional Council of Governments.”

The EPA and SEQL knew local elected officials would never sign on to something with “sustainable development” or EPA, in the title even in 2005. So SEQL cleverly “laundered their EPA funding” by setting up Centralina Council of Governments. Centralina Council of Governments then assists government and business leaders in Cleveland County to create the Cleveland County Land Use Plan, published on April 19th, 2005. (Click here to download)  

Before we go further please make note of this. Gaspee recently posted on a very significant declaration that came out of the latest United Nations climate summit held in Cancun.

Martin Chavez, the Executive Director of ICLEI stated:

“For the first time in the history of climate negotiations, the United Nations has officially recognized the crucial roles of local governments in fighting climate change – as local governments are now identified by delegate nations as “government stakeholders”. (Click here to read post)

Note that SEQL , and ICLEI also use the term, Stakeholder. That is a very popular term within the UN’s sustainability agenda.

And that is only the first of MANY similarities between SEQL, ICLEI, the United Nations Agenda 21, AND Cleveland County’s Land Use Plan. Please print both and compare them for yourselves.

ICLEI-STAR Sustainable Community’s Index (click here)

Cleveland County Land Use Plan (click here)

On a separate note…does the Cancun declaration potentially mean that Shelby City Council members or County Commissioners could go and participate in official UN proceedings without the consent of our State or Federal legislature? Gaspee will save that for another story.

There are a few parts of the Cleveland County Land Use Plan that make good sence, however for the most part, it reads like an economy killing manifesto written by Al Gore. 

In my brief reading of the Land Use Plan Open Space is discussed on 12 different pages. I enjoy Crowder’s Mountain as much as anyone, but bear in mind that for every OPEN space, there is one less JOB space. Bicycles and sidewalk space are discussed on five pages each, and coincidentally I’m sure, people riding bicycles and walking on sidewalks are on the cover of ICLEI’s STAR Guidelines. Housing built around mass transit are discussed in both. The Land Use Plan also states Cleveland County communities should be “walkable” in nature just as ICLEI’s STAR Guidelines mandate.

Here are the ISSUES facing Cleveland County as defined by the 42 author’s of the Land Use Plan:

STEERING COMMITTEE ISSUES OF CONCERN

ISSUE 1. RURAL CHARACTER

Cleveland County residents value their rural lifestyles, their views, and their green space, and DON’T want to lose them.

Maintain lower-density residential development.

Keep the “rural” feel of the community—protect viewsheds and ensure that new development fits with older.

Limit industrial or commercial growth to existing towns or major corridors—but preserve the sense that one has “arrived” in a town by not having continuous development from town to town.

Include some type of design guidelines for commercial development to ensure that it “fits in” with its surroundings.

Green and open space is critical—preserve it in any new housing developments. Viewsheds should be preserved by buffering.

ISSUE 2. CITIES, TOWNS, AND VILLAGES

Development should occur FIRST in existing cities, towns, and villages.

A healthy mix of uses should be encouraged—people should be able to “live over the store.”  Mixed use can work in any community if it’s designed properly.

More urbanized areas should be walkable and connected—especially in communities with water and sewer.

Sidewalks are a must in more urbanized areas, and in new subdivisions in towns.

Multi-family development is appropriate for all communities if it’s in an area with water/sewer and is designed to fit in with the environs.

Parks, greenways, trails, and civic space should be included in urban and village planning.

Our towns and villages should not be simply extensions of highway sprawl, but should have identifiable “gateways” or perhaps even greenbelts.

ISSUE 3

COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT

Commercial development should have a sense of permanency—it should not look “thrown together” or “temporary”. It SHOULD fit in with the image we want our community to project.

Traditional “strip” development is not preferred, but development that shares driveways is a possibility IF the development is well designed.

Commercial development should not be “strung out” along the highway but clustered in nodes around major intersections.

Provide some type of proposal to handle big-box stores—either a plan to handle their abandonment or incentives to re-use them.

Signage should be better regulated.

Consideration should be given to regulating outdoor lighting so that it lights what it’s meant to, but doesn’t create “light pollution.”

ISSUE 4

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

Areas suggested for industrial growth include:

Northwest Shelby

The I-85 Corridor

The Highway 18 Corridor

The Kings Mountain/Shelby Corridor

At selected sites along the new Shelby Bypass Grover

The residents of Grover are particularly interested in redevelopment rather than greenfields sites.

Infrastructural improvements designed to facilitate industrial recruitment should be actively investigated and implemented. [As long as it is LIGHT Industrial, read further down]

Industrial development should be sufficiently buffered, landscaped, and otherwise regulated so that it does not negatively impact adjoining uses.

Light industry is preferred over heavy industry, which is perceived as being bad for the environment.

In Upper Cleveland County, the preference for industrial uses is for smaller, low-traffic type uses rather than one or two major employers. In Upper Cleveland County, buffering is particularly important. 

The one place in Upper Cleveland County where commercial/industrial development should perhaps be encouraged is along NC18 between Fallston and Belwood.

ISSUE 5

RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

There is a sense that residents would rather not have smaller (10-15 home) subdivisions on cul-de-sacs that are one-way-in/one-way-out and spaced out along the highway—they would rather have larger (or even small) developments that are connected to the fabric of the community.

Residential development in all areas of the county ideally should reflect its context—in rural areas, that may mean that larger, non-“family” development is buffered so that rural viewsheds are retained.

Multi-family development should take place in city, town, or village centers, and not in rural areas (where there is no sewer to support it).

Multi-family development may be appropriate along the US 74 Corridor where it may be a form of transit-oriented development.

Manufactured housing will probably always be with us as a form of affordable housing.

ISSUE 6

OPEN SPACE AND GREENWAYS

There is a need for a greenway network in Cleveland County.

Open space and rural landscapes must be preserved.

Civic open space is important—parks, trails, greenways, etc.

Regulations that control clear-cutting are needed.

A Countywide open space plan should be created.

ISSUE 7

UTILITIES

Since sewer treatment plants encourage development, careful attention must be given to where they go.

ISSUE 8

TRANSPORTATION PLANNING

NC 18 is a potential corridor to link to I-40 and it should be planned—in accordance with the caveats listed above for rural character, commercial, and industrial development.

Upper Cleveland County should keep its two-lane road network so that additional development isn’t encouraged—although the roads should be made safer with wider shoulders, etc.

One-way-in/one-way-out residential and commercial development is not desirable.

Connectivity is preferred, where feasible.

ISSUE 9

ENFORCEMENT

Code enforcement is an issue now, and added regulations will increase the perceived enforcement gap.

Commercial properties need code enforcement just as much as residential properties do.

Government should provide sufficient resources to meet the code enforcement needs.

Conditional use zoning is needed to give the County better control on how development takes place.

Now I do not claim to be an expert when it comes to “town planning”  however, does this plan send a message to potential companies wanting to relocate that Cleveland County covets them, or does it say KEEP OUT?

We now know that NCDENR has adopted (click here to read) the UN’s version of sustainable development. We now know that Cleveland County is a member of the EPA funded SEQL, and SEQL has links on their website to ICLEI and LA21, or Local Agenda 21 (click here to see). And we now know that SB 897 created the Sustainable Communities Task Force, and that NCDENR, listed as a partner to SEQL as well, will be the State agency that will drive the “sustainability agenda” in North Carolina.

My question is simple:

HAS CLEVELAND COUNTY ADOPTED THE UNITED NATIONS VERSION OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AS WELL?

To my freedom loving neighbor’s in other states, please investigate to see if your town has submitted a similar land use plan, to a similar EPA front group in your region.

To my freedom loving neighbors in Cleveland County; have powerful interests been hindering growth in our county, based on the biggest scientific hoax of modern times? 

If so what are WE prepared to do about it?

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Study demonstrates that “reduced vehicle ownership, increased bicycle ownership, and policy interventions, are important positive determinants of weekend physical activity participation levels.

ICLEI/STAR Guidelines state in the Health and Safety/Active Living section:

Sustainable Communities create opportunities for and promote the integration of recreation and physical activity into people’s daily routines and the built environment

A study from the Southwest Region University Transportation Center confirms that if there are fewer cars, people will be more “active”.

Well I bet so! 

Let me guess what the next $100,000 study will show…that if we drastically reduce food production, the population will decrease.

Click 161020-1 Report Abstract to read  

The report focuses on analyzing and modeling the physical activity participation levels (in terms of the number of daily “bouts” or “episodes” of physical activity during a weekend day) of all members of a family jointly.  The results indicate that reduced vehicle ownership and increased bicycle ownership are important positive determinants of weekend physical activity participation levels…

Our results also suggest that policy interventions aimed at increasing children’s physical activity levels could potentially benefit from targeting entire family units rather than targeting only children.

Finally, the results indicate strong and asymmetric dependence among the unobserved physical activity determinants of family members. In particular, the results show that unobserved factors (such as residence location-related constraints and family lifestyle preferences) result in individuals in a family having uniformly low physical activity, but there is less clustering of this kind at the high end of the physical activity propensity spectrum.

So let me summarize:

In this case science has demonstrated: (which is dictated by Obama’s new executive order, click here to read)

Your right as an American to own private property like a car, and a house away from the city, are causing you to lead an unhealthy, therefore, unsustainable lifestyle. So your children must be re-educated and then assimilated back into the Collective.  

Am I going to far? Please I beg you, take the time to read the ICLEI/STAR guidelines. (click here to read)  Nine American cities are beta tests for these guidelines, and Atlanta is one of them.

“These 81 sustainability goals and 10 guiding principles [STAR Community Index] collectively define community-scale sustainability, and present a vision of how communities can become more healthy, inclusive, and prosperous across eight specific categories.”

COLLECTIVELY being the key word. These guidelines, which are the new measure for whether or not your community is “sustainable”, as defined by the UN/ICLEI, sound a lot like they want to transform humanity into a colony of ants or bees. Where freedom and INDIVIDUAL Natural Rights given to us by God, and made law of the land in the US Constitution, are replaced by Collectivist ideologies. Ayn Rand put it this way:

“Collectivism means the subjugation of the individual to a group — whether to a race, class or state does not matter. Collectivism holds that man must be chained to collective action and collective thought for the sake of what is called ‘the common good’.”

If you do not rise up, educate yourself, and run the collectivist’s out of your City Council, County Commissioners, Mayor’s, city governments etc., then no one else will either.

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NOAA Scientist John Miller: “We need to do everything we can globally to reduce population”

Shout Out to MorphCity.com where I initially saw this video! Population reduction is a major plank of Agenda 21, as well as ICLEI. Is any commentary even needed for this? Gaspee will be reaching out to the Commerce Dept, which NOAA is a part of, to get their reaction to Mr. Millers comments.

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Food Diversion Laws in the USA? Can’t happen here right?

WRONG.

 San Francisco voted in 2009 to “make composting lawn clippings and food scraps mandatory for every city resident.”

Now if you have a garden I understand composting is wonderful for it. And if you choose to compost more power to you. But do we need to mandate food diversion laws and lawn clipping police through the NCDENR?

Whether the law is truly enforceable or not, I want my readers to ponder how far we have fallen from a Constitutionally limited Republic form of government when local cities make it MANDATORY to divert lawn clippings and left overs from your dinner table.  

The sustainability agenda must be stopped one municipality at a time. The first thing lawmakers in NC need to consider is repealing SB 897 . Section 13.5 of the 2010 appropriations bill puts all of the framework in place to make ridiculous laws like food diversion in place, in North Carolina, in the name of sustainability. Please share this post with a county commissioner, city councilman, city manager, or mayor and ask them if they support sustainability laws like this being passed in your town.

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So many sustainability workshops in NC, not enough time!

The Research Triangle Regional Partnership is hosting

“A Green Future for Economic Development: The Dollars and Sense of Open Space,” will be held 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the McKimmon Center at N.C. State University.

Keynote addresses by national experts in linking open space planning for economic development: Edward T. McMahon, senior resident fellow and Charles E. Fraser Chair for Sustainable Development and Environmental Policy at the Urban Land Institute, an expert in open space planning to promote economic growth. Urban Land Institute is also a major contributor to ICLEI’s STAR guidelines.

More “open” spaces is less space for your house and mine. Don’t worry though just like in Dubai, India when they bulldozed houses of the poor people because they needed the land to build mass transit systems, the Government bought them all new “compact” housing. More to come on that story. Or if open spaces do not interest me maybe I could go take a class on how to “privatize” my town’s water supply. You will even learn here how to create propaganda that will cover up what you are doing to the voters! What a value.

Water and Wastewater Infrastructure Funding Strategies

The University of North Carolina’s Environmental Finance Center is hosting  “Water and Wastewater Funding Strategies workshop.”  It will provide utility practitioners with new skills and up-to-date information on infrastructure finance planning strategies and funding resources.  This workshop is a part of the EFC’s Water Management Leadership Program.

Workshop topics include:

  • Update on public state and federal programs including Stimulus Infrastructure Funding
  • Crafting inter-local infrastructure agreements and partnerships
  • Pricing and infrastructure fee options
  • Case studies of successful capital finance planning
  • Private finance options and trends
  • Methods for successfully presenting information to funding sources, the public and elected officials

Or if neither one of those float your boat, you could attend NC Department of the Environment and Natural Resources  Division of Environmental Assistance and Outreach’s workshop on the exciting topic of food diversion in NC. The state of North Carolina adopted the EPA’s Food Waste Recovery Hierarch, which states that the last place food waste should go is a land fill! Your leftovers should be diverted to either feed hungry people, feed animals, or composted. Hey North Carolina aren’t you glad that even in the midst of a $3 billion dollar budget crisis in NC, we still have some money left over for this.

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Filed under ICLEI Local Governments for Sustainability, Sustainability

What will you do when the Fed’s show up to inspect your drainage pipes?

By Bob Unruh
WorldNetDaily

A sanitation district in Pennsylvania has notified homeowners that its representatives will be making personal visits to every structure served by its network of drainpipes because that’s what the federal Environmental Protection Agency is demanding.

The letter informs homeowners the inspections will probably take only about 15 minutes, but that all properties “will be considered a source of clear water discharges until an inspection can be conducted.”

WND Story, read full story here

This is coming to a town near you because as  Chief of the Targeting and Evaluation Branch of the Enforcement Planning and Targeting and Data Division of the EPA, Richard Duffy said in 1996, (read it here ) “That what gets measured, get’s done”

How can the EPA know if your drainpipes are “sustainable” if they cannot inspect them first? Let’s hope PA holds the line. Probably would not hurt to let your elected officials know about this one.

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Filed under Agenda 21, Sustainability